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  • January 17, 2017

Waveform inversion for 3-D S-velocity structure discovers possible evidence for a remnant slab and a passive plume

Suzuki et al. (2016) have conducted waveform inversion to infer the three-dimensional (3-D) S-velocity structure in the lowermost 400 km of the mantle (the D'' region) beneath the Northern Pacific region. The 3-D S-velocity model obtained in this study shows prominent features of velocity anomalies. The high-velocity anomalies are interpreted as remnants of slab material where the bridgmanite to Mg-post-perovskite phase transition may have occurred within the slab; the low-velocity… Read more

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  • January 17, 2017

Slip-partitioned surface ruptures following the 2016 Mw 7.0 Kumamoto earthquake

Together with geodetic and seismic inversions of subsurface fault slip for the 2016 Mw = 7.0 16 April 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, Toda et al. (2016) present a schematic structural model where oblique motion occurred on a northwest-dipping subsurface fault and the slip is partitioned at the surface into strike-slip and normal fault scarps. Their simple dislocation model demonstrates that this bifurcation into pure strike-slip and normal faults likely occurs for… Read more

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  • November 15, 2016

Response of hydrothermal system to stress changes

Time-lapse monitoring of seismic velocity at volcanic areas can provide unique insight into the property of hydrothermal and magmatic fluids and their temporal variability. Taira and Brenguier (2016) established a quasi real-time velocity monitoring system by using seismic interferometry with ambient noise to explore the temporal evolution of velocity in the Lassen Volcanic Center, Northern California. Read more

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  • November 15, 2016

Toward the effective geodetic observation network

About 40 tracking stations all over the world are currently operational for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), a very precise geodetic technique. Otsubo et al. (2016) ran a unique simulation to find the optimal place of a future SLR station. The answer depends on a geodetic product and one example is shown for the center of gravity of the Earth: the X and Y components are largely improved by a high-latitude station especially in the southern hemisphere, whereas the Z component is improved by a low-latitude station. Read more

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  • October 14, 2016

In-flight scalar calibration of the Swarm magnetometry package

Tøffner-Clausen et al. (2016) presented the in-flight scalar calibration and characterisation of the Swarm magnetometry package consisting of the absolute scalar magnetometer, the vector magnetometer, and the spacecraft structure supporting the instruments. A significant improvement in the scalar residuals between the pairs of magnetometers is demonstrated, confirming the high performance of these instruments. Read more

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